How to Make a Good Showreel | Acting Advice
showreel

How to Make a Good Showreel

Written by on | How To

A showreel is increasingly becoming more important. The focus of the acting industry is on film and TV, and so agents and casting agents almost always want to see your work on film. Though inviting people along to a show is still a great idea, and though theatre is still highly valued, your showreel is crucial in getting you an agent, or an audition. Here are some thoughts on how to make a good showreel…

Choose a reputable company

This seems pretty self-evident, however, you would be surprised at how many over priced, poor quality showreel companies are out there. I would always ask your peers for advice. Look at your friends showreels, and see which ones you like. Ask them how it was to work with the company they used. The quality of the showreel is important, but you also need to feel comfortable with the team/director who is shooting it.

Choose an appropriate scene

Make sure you have chosen a great scene. Something you are comfortable acting, but that also showcases your ability. If you have no other footage, I would recommend going something short and simple, around 2 minutes. But if you want to put yourself out there as a particular type of actor, choose a scene that plays to that. It is always important to think about what acting work you really want to do, and what your strengths are as an actor.

Find a good scene partner

Don’t just ask anyone to help you out with your showreel. Acting is reacting, and having a good scene partner will help your showreel hugely. Make sure it’s someone you feel comfortable with and someone who is committed to making it a great showreel. Often you can split the cost between you and your scene partner, which is great. But make sure if the showreel is for both of you, one of you isn’t losing out. Find a scene that is great for each of you. This may take some time.

Rehearse thoroughly

Make sure you are well rehearsed before you start the shoot. It is likely things will change on the day, so the more comfortable you are with your lines and the scene in general the more free you will be to play on the day.

About the Author

is Stage Milk's core writer. He is a trained, Sydney based actor who writes the majority of our acting information.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *